Eternal Insight Podcast Episode 1: Reflections from Eternal Weekend, with Brian Kelly

Brian Kelly has been an ambassador for sportsmanship and friendliness in Vintage Magic for the past few years following his return to Magic: the Gathering. He is a great role model and excellent player who shows great respect and humility towards his peers. On August 24th, 2015 he made Magic history by becoming the Vintage World Champion, a title held by such prestigious players as Roland Chang, Stephen Menendian, and Owen Turtenwald. He was gracious enough to take the time to go over how a deck of his own design, dubbed by the community as “Brian Kelly Oath,” or as he as aptly named it “Dragonlord Salvagers Oath.” Brian was able to post an impressive 9-1 record in the Swiss rounds and then won in the Top 8 to become champion. We go on a trip through his history as a Magic player, and everyone who helped him along the way to this momentous achievement. or the next hundred or so minutes we take a glimpse into what has crafted the nicest and most sportsmanlike players I have ever met into a force to be reckoned with. A person who I have the great pleasure to be friends with, and I know has had a positive influence on everyone he has met. So, for the first installment of “Reflections from Eternal Weekend,” I have the great pleasure to present the Vintage World Champion, Brian Kelly.

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Vintage Champs 2015 Coverage – Decklists, Metagame Report, Video, and Report Roundup

Vintage Champs 2015 is in the books, and with record-breaking attendance, cannot be considered anything other than a smashing success. Huge props go out to Nick Coss, Card Titan, and all associated employess and consultants who organized and ran the largest Vintage event ever held (and who also graciously provided us access to all of the standings and decklists below). Vintage Champs attendance has been climbing steadily the past few years, with both renewed interest from older players, as well as slowly expanding the player base to newer/younger players.

483 were registered for Vintage Champs 2015, and although there were 20+ no-shows (mainly people who slept in or just registered to get the sweet Tolarian Academy playmat), that number combined with the byes from Legacy Champs Top 8 playoff the same morning, meant 10 rounds of Swiss, followed by a Top 8 playoff.

Below we have compiled the Top 128 decklists (with more appearing on this page as time allows), a full metagame report of all decks/archetypes played and in what quantities, as well as some statistics for analysis (we will add more as time permits, or as requests/suggestions roll in). Videos and a tournament report roundup (with links to players’ tournament reports from the event, as they surface) can be found at the bottom.

(Note: this page will be constantly updated as we add more decklists, round up more tournament reports, and as more videos are uploaded to YouTube by the tournament organizer. Last updated 10/4/2015)

NYSE Vintage Open 3 – ALL Decklists, Video, and Metagame Report

NYSE 3 is safely in the rear view mirror, and was another great showing of Vintage love and dynamism, with the event selling out all available 150 seats. With an entrance fee of $100 limiting the field to players serious about their Vintage craft, the field was turbo-charged with many of America’s most dedicated players, voyaging from far and wide across the country to Long Island, New York (USA). Community stalwart Nick Detwiler (aka Prospero) continues to do a masterful job promoting and supporting Vintage, and it should come as no surprise that this tournament showcased the continued resurgence of interest in Vintage in North America.

Schools of Magic: History of Vintage – 2003

For a format whose history stretches back towards the origins of the game, 2003 may well lay claim to being the most dynamic and pivotal year before or since in the history of Vintage. It was a year in which the format was rocked by dramatic restrictions, metagame convulsions, astounding printings and shocking new mechanics, quickened engagement and interest from the DCI and Wizards of the Coast, and the inauguration of a new annual Championship tournament. The investments of the player base in 2002 were bearing fruit, and the innovations and novel strategic developments were accelerating. New strategies were born, and old Schools of Vintage Magic were revived. In a sense, 2003 was a springboard for the evolution of the format since. It marks a transition from historical Type I to the format that would soon become known as Vintage.